Tag Archives: dairy

Are we there yet?

As the end of my service approaches, what am I thinking? 


Well… for starters… “has it already been 2 years?!?!” which I immediately chase with “it’s about freaking time.” Then the more meaningful, complex thoughts begin emerging, which if left unattended will absolutely consume my mind and my thoughts. So, then, what am I thinking? What’s for supper? What am I gonna wear tomorrow? I wonder if it’s going to rain… then I’ll have to wear my sneakers. Maybe Ambalo will be late so I can wear leggings. I hope we have mandazi at tea break. How did I gain 10 pounds? 
 
So basically, coming home isn’t something I’m giving much thought. It’s going to be tough. 
 
But since I’m not really into thinking about that, and I’m not really into boring you to death either, I’ll talk a little about how things are going at school.
 
Class 8 (8th graders) just finished their KCPE – possibly the most important week of their lives, marked by hours of sitting in a classroom with an armed police officer guarding the door and 3 adult teachers sitting and staring at them as they select ABCDE for 50 questions, 6 exams. It’s a pretty stressful time for all involved, but thankfully it’s now finished and they are preparing to go home. All students will be going home this Wednesday, November 20th. Parents will come in the morning and have some meetings, receive their children with report forms in tow and vanish into the village until January, when school reopens, sans Kelsey. 
 
But now I’m getting ahead of myself again. What else is new here… 
 
Both of our cows have now given birth! As many of you may have seen on facebook, the first to birth was Lucy (the mean one) on November 8th. In fact, I went to the harambee with Mr. Ambalo, and when we returned we immediately went to check the cows. It started raining and we became stuck in the cow stable, waiting for the rain to stop, when we realized that Lucy was going into labour. Baby Kelsey was born before dark with no problems at all. Here’s a cute picture of our new baby girl: 
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Today, at 4:07 this morning, Michelle gave birth to another baby girl. 
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So now we have 2 baby girls and 2 big mama’s to milk. I help our worker, Christopher, with milking every morning and evening. Michelle turned out to be a little sassy, but I think that she’s settling down now. The kids are all thrilled to be able to drink milk every evening after supper, and since school is getting ready to close we will be making quite a bit of money selling the milk every day. Lucy is producing about 15liters every day, and today being the first day we milked Michelle, we can’t really guess how much she will contribute, but I’m expecting her to surpass Lucy. We’ll see. Either way, it will help offset expenses for the parents who can’t afford to pay school fees! THANK YOU to every single contribution! You guys are the ones who put these cows here – thank you a million times over!
 
In other news… all of my kids are healthy and strong. Denis came back to school and is putting weight back on. He finished his exams last week and has been helping take care of the cows. None of the kids have started milking yet, but they all pitch in when it comes to bringing water and working in the garden where we grow grasses to feed them. In fact, today all of my kids helped dig flower gardens along my house and the office. We worked on it this morning and even lined them with small rocks collected from around the compound. I’ll add a few pictures for you to see.
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While Denis was at the hospital, I met a man who worked there and knew of another deaf child staying at home in his village. He was curious about what services were available, or what people do with such children, so I explained that normally we treat them like humans and educate them. We exchanged info and on Monday of last week, Ambalo arranged to have him brought to school. He’s a feisty little thing, terrorizing all of his agemates, but it’s good he came this term to adjust to school life so when he returns next term it won’t be so shocking to him. 
 
So, that’s life at Nina. Let’s have a countdown: 
5 more days with my kids
6 days until my farewell party
16 days until I leave my home in Siaya (to Nairobi for close of service procedures)
21 days until I am no longer a Peace Corps Volunteer
30 days until I say goodbye to Kenya and hello to Vietnam
55 days until my feet touch American soil for the first time in over a year. 
 
OMG! OMG! OMG!
 
Soooooooooo, what am I gonna wear tomorrow?

We’ve got MILK!

Finally, one of our cows has given birth to a beautiful baby girl named Kelsey! I was able to help with the delivery and see her first steps – and even give the udder the first squeeze 🙂 Here are a few pics from her first few days.

Newborn baby Kelsey!

Day 1

Milking on the second day

WIth Christopher, the cow worker

This and That

Money for Milk!

Exciting news everyone! As many of you know, I’ve been working on a grant through the Peace Corps to raise money for milk cows for my school – and today it was approved! The grant program has created a fund for donations towards my particular grant, which can be accessed here:

https://donate.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=donate.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=615-208

It is my intent to purchase two milk cows for my school to reduce expenditures within the school. I am blessed to have a school that accepts all children, regardless of their ability to pay school fees. However, this creates a financial burden on the school because the government does not provide money for meals or bedding, and the kids are expected to come to school with hygiene items, blankets, mattresses, etc. Many of the kids who come to our boarding school bring only the clothes they are wearing.

After examining our expenditures and income, I realized that a significant amount of money was being spent on milk daily. Milk here is not expensive, by American standards, but compared to other food items we purchase, a large portion of our food budget is allocated to the purchase of milk. Utilizing our own milk would significantly reduce the amount of money being spent in our food budget, which would help cover expenses for basic needs for the kids, as well as help the school generate income during break when the school is closed.

No donation is too small, even $1 USD will help us reach our goal. We hope to raise just under $3,700 USD. This will cover the purchase of two milk cows and all materials/labour for maintenance and constructing their living quarters. Share this with your friends and feel free to let me know if you have any questions! Thank you so much!